Future Planning and Legal Advice



A major concern for a carer of a person with disability is how the person they care for will be supported in the future when they are no longer able to provide the love, support and care themselves.   The following links provide information concerning some decisions and issues that you may need to address when planning the future with a person who has Down syndrome.

Information for Vulnerable Beneficiaries and their parents/carers - This document was provided by Allan Swan.


•The FaHCSIA "Planning for the Future" booklet and website provides information about legal contacts, trusts and many other aspects concerning planning for the future.


"Securing their future" provides information about enduring powers of attorney, Guardianship and administation and planning for the future.


•The 2013 Law Help Directory is a comprehensive listing of free and low cost legal services in Victoria.

Assistance to make financial, medical or accommodation choices

Down Syndrome Victoria strongly supports self determination for adults who have Down Syndrome, however, there are some people who may need the support of a parent or other adult in making decisions about financial, medical or accommodation matters. The Office of the Public Advocate  Home — Office of the Public Advocate, Victoria, Australia website has information on obtaining Power of Attorney, Guardianship and Administration, Medical Consent and other information which may be helpful.

Palliative Care and End of Life Choice

For some individuals who may be experiencing a life threatening illness decisions may need to be made on their behalf, regarding cessation of medical treatment, particularly in circumstances where the person’s quality of life is very poor. Palliative Care services are available to assist in the support of individuals and their families at home or in hospice facilities. Palliative Care Victoria, Palliative Care, palliative, hospice care, end of life care, Melbourne, respite care

Some people may want to ensure that their wishes are respected regarding minimal medical intervention. The Office of the public Advocate Website has a form which can be completed in conjunction with a general practitioner called Refusal of Medical Treatment. Medical consent — Office of the Public Advocate, Victoria, Australia

Some families may find this site helpful also: Respecting Patient Choices